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22nd September, 2021

Wadden Sea ecology in focus at the Estuaries and coastal seas in the Anthropocene 58 Conference.

The Wadden Sea was recognised with a dedicated session during the conference ECSA 58 - EMECS 13: Estuaries and coastal seas in the Anthropocene – Structure, functions, services and management which took place as an online event from September 6 to 9, 2021.

3rd September, 2021

More than 100 dead harbour porpoises stranded in the Dutch Wadden Sea.

More than 100 dead harbour porpoises have washed up on the beaches of the Dutch Wadden Sea islands of Vlieland, Terschelling, Ameland and Schiermonnikoog in the last week, as reported by the University of Utrecht.

20th July, 2021

Third webinar on Sediment Solutions

The third webinar working towards a trilateral Community of Understanding for sediment solutions was held in June.

30th March, 2021

Policy statement on the Wadden Sea SWIMWAY approved

WG-Swimway and invited guests drafted a policy statement based on existing guidelines and regulations with a direct link to the Trilateral Fish Targets at European level and how these have been implemented per country and trying to analyse their contribution to the realization of these targets.

22nd March, 2021

Where Mud Matters - towards a mud balance for the Trilateral Wadden Sea

Report on the first silt balance assessment for the trilateral Wadden Sea published.

18.05.2021

Second NCK-Waddenacademie theme day

Webinar

16th December, 2020

First results of 2020 flyway count published

In January 2020 the third Total Count of the East Atlantic Flyway was organized. The now published compilation of national reports gives a first overview of the bird numbers counted in 32 countries along the Flyway.

14th December, 2020

Webinar towards a trilateral sediment solutions Community of Understanding

On 27 November, the trilateral webinar Sediment Solutions was held.

18th November, 2020

Report on vulnerability of the Wadden Sea World Heritage to climate change published

Extreme heat events, temperature increase and sea level rise could be the key stressors of climate change, which will affect the Wadden Sea World Heritage site.